Where dreams come to die (Part Five)

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She continued, “They went down to sleep. I kept sitting on my bed, wide-eyed. Sleep had long left my brain. I looked around, reassured myself that there was no one in my room, and contemplated the theory that I might’ve been sleepwalking or something. I was ready to accept any scenario save for the one where thieves were still in the house waiting to kill all of us and take all our belongings. I went to the loo then and upon returning, I kid you not: I found the envelope on my bed. It lay there just like before, that same bloody shiny envelope. I thought: fuck it, I am going to open it and so I tore it up.”

Gur was paying some more attention now.

“Inside, there was a letter. You won’t believe what was written in it. It said to bring you in my room and tell you all about what happened, which is what I am doing right now.”

He was surprised, but it was not evident from his face.

“So you find a letter and blindly follow what’s written in it! Alright! But how do you know about my letters?” he asked.

“That is the most interesting part, Gur! I am completely clueless as to how I know about your letters. I just do! Also, I don’t blindly follow instructions. Do not think so lowly of me okay! After reading the letter, somehow, my eyelids started feeling heavy. It might have been because of the time, as it was way past midnight. My birthday had begun and my phone was vibrating incessantly. Usually, I sleep at around 11 and am a light sleeper but I just couldn’t stay awake. It was as if I’d passed out. I woke up today morning and the letter was nowhere to be found. I know that because searching for it was the first thing I did after getting up. Also, I automatically knew about you and your letters. You were going to be at the party today, so I thought why not follow the instructions! Why not see our own adventure unfold? In fact, I was too curious to hold myself back. So, please tell me what you know. Pretty please?”

Gur was about to say something when there was a knock at the door. It was her mother. She asked both of them to come downstairs. She was a loud woman who never cared much about her daughter. She was always a little extra polite in front of Gur, probably because he belonged to a wealthy family and her husband was always on the lookout for financiers. He had a never settling brain and always came up with new business ideas. He had tried his luck in mutual funds investment, a soap factory and also a board game business, but to no avail. They still were well to do. Their house was bigger than most and the way their daughter lived, there seemed little to complain about. An outsider couldn’t have found any problem in their way of living. Inside, it was another story. The parents fought too much, the daughter was suicidal and nobody cared about anybody.

Gur obliged her mother and readily went down with her. On the stairs, she asked him to meet her in school the following day so that they could complete their conversation without any hindrance. She cut the cake and her parents smiled throughout. Gur was feeling left out and his social interaction limit was fast approaching, so he decided it was better to leave. He was a little too confused about it all. He scurried to his home, and the first thing he did after reaching was checking his dustbin. Thankfully, it hadn’t been emptied out and the letter was still there. He took it out and tossed it on his bed. He then found the first letter and came back to the bed where the second one was kept. All the while wondering that maybe if the letters didn’t make sense individually, they just might do together!

contd.

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